Geobit exhibits at 3ecees, 4-9 Sep. 2022

Geobit exhibits at 3ecees, 4-9 Sep. 2022

3rd European Conference on Earthquake Engineering & Seismology

We are pleased to announce that Geobit is exhibiting at 3rd European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, 4-9 September. We welcome you to visit our booth, to meet our team and learn about our new upcoming instruments and technologies. We will also be available to answer your questions. You can watch our poster presentations on Monday 5th and Wednesday 7th of September.

The European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology is being held 4–9 September 2022 in Bucharest, Romania.

We hope to see you there!

When: 4 - 9 September 2022

Where: Palace of Parliament, Strada Izvor 2-4, Sector 5, Bucharest.

Geobit’s poster presentation schedule

Poster number: 9352

Turning a linear geometry force balance accelerometer to a broad-band seismometer: Design, modelling, and evaluation

  • Presentation: Nikos Germenis
  • Date: Mon, 5 Sep.

Geo-S120 Broadband Seismometer

Abstract: In this work we present a prototype broadband seismometer which is based on a previously designed force-balance accelerometer. The mechanical system has been redesigned to meet the required self-noise levels of the system and the electronic part has been modified in a way to produce velocity output providing the desired sensitivity. The mechanical part has been extensively simulated and adjusted for having the main oscillation mode frequency into the desired recording band and having all other oscillation modes frequencies far outside the used recording band. The electronic part has been carefully designed towards very low electronic noise, which in addition with the mechanical system noise, will result in a total sensor self-noise level, lower the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) in a wide band range. The sensor has been extensively tested and compared against a commercial seismometer, with similar specifications in terms of self-noise. The experiment proved that the new prototype sensor performed equally to the reference unit. The new design offers a simpler sensor at a lower cost.

Poster number: 1955

A new force balance accelerograph for earthquake and structural monitoring based on a linear geometry accelerometer.

  • Presentation: Nikos Germenis
  • Date: Wed, 7 Sep.

    Abstract: In this work we present a new force balance accelerograph which uses three similar acceleration sensors, one per axis. The sensors are based on a linear geometry mechanical system, made mostly by common commercially used materials and typical FR4 printed circuit boards. The mechanical system uses a double force actuator to provide symmetrical axial feedback force to the seismic mass. The signal of the three sensors goes to a high resolution 32bits ADC digitizer with an open Linux operating system that makes it ideal for local and remote seismic monitoring applications. The mechanical system of the sensor has been extensively simulated for having its main oscillation mode frequency into its recording band and all other oscillation modes frequencies far outside the recording band. Extensive parametric analysis of the seismic mass supporting spring resulted that the optimal spring shape is the ellipsoidal. The feedback electronic circuit has been carefully designed towards very low electronic noise, which in addition with the mechanical system noise, will result in a total sensor self-noise level, lower the Accelerometer Low Noise Model (ALNM). The digitizer supports seedlink encoding real time data streaming and local storage through locally running open-source components ported on an ARM Linux board. The accelerograph tested and compared against a commercial accelerometer and provided a similar performance in terms of noise level and recording bandwidth. The new design offers a simpler sensor at a lower cost.

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    Geobit is presenting virtually at the AGU Fall Meeting 2021

    Geobit is presenting virtually at the AGU Fall Meeting 2021

    HOW WILL GEOBIT & ISTI BE INVOLVED IN AGU 2021.

    Updates on Booth status & Posters

    BOOTH STATUS

    • Update: Though GEObit & ISTI will not have a 2021 booth, we are excited to present our AGU posters online this year (details below).

    ABSTRACTS ONLINE

    • When: 13 – 17 December 2021
    • Where: Online

    Nikos Germenis, (Geobit), is presenting virtually at the AGU Fall Meeting being held 13 – 17 December 2021.

    S25E-0302 – A new Class-A triaxial Force-Balance Accelerograph Based on a Low-Cost Acceleration Sensor for Earthquake and Structural Monitoring Applications.

    This work presents an innovative class-A compact digital accelerograph suitable for earthquake and structural monitoring. The accelerograph exploits newly developed acceleration sensing elements [1], as well as software that integrates it to modern large scale IoT infrastructures [2].

    The sensor design is based on a linear displacement transducer with a double spring pendulum and double coil-magnet forcer. The seismic mass is made by FR3 PCB and is suspended from the frame using double ellipsoid shape leaf springs, while an additional weight has been attached to the seismic mass in order to improve sensitivity. Two nylon bobbins with 36m winded wire along with two N45 magnets consist the 38N/A double forcer. The frames of the sensing elements are made by aluminum and the electronics boards that implement the feedback loop are located on the top of each frame. Each sensing element produces 2.5V/g with a range of +/-4g. A high density electronics board houses the digitizer, the recorder and the communication section of the instrument. The digitizer uses three 32bit ADCs providing dynamic range over 140dB and GNSS or NTP timing. The recorder creates miniSEED files of raw and triggered data and stores them locally or transmits them in real time utilizing the SeedLink protocol.

    Trigger detection is based on open source components ported from the earthworm toolchain, coupled by MQTT-based signaling for trigger event distribution, following multiple centralized or distributed schemes. This flexible operation allows the user to select between low-latency but reduced network efficiency operation of raw data telemetry, local trigger detection and partial raw data transmission improving the network efficiency, local trigger detection and trigger signal only transmission, or centralized trigger detection and command reception to transmit partial or full raw data, supporting a wide range of systems for earthquake and structural monitoring or modern early warning applications.

    [1] AOGS poster, Design, Modeling and Performance Evaluation of a Class-a Triaxial Force-balance Accelerometer for earthquake monitoring, SE04-A001, AOGS21-Reg-2779

    [2] N Germenis, P Fountas, C Koulamas, Low Latency and Low Cost Smart Embedded Seismograph for Early Warning IoT Applications, 9th Mediterranean Conference on Embedded Computing 2020

    Check details: AGU Fall Meeting 2021.

    Geobit & ISIT online presentation schedule

    GEOBIT’S POSTER

    S25E-0302 A new Class-A triaxial Force-Balance Accelerograph Based on a Low-Cost Acceleration Sensor for Earthquake and Structural Monitoring Applications

    Authors: Nikos Germenis, Christos A Koulamas, GEObit Instruments PC (w/ Pantelis G Nikolakopoulos, University of Patras)

    • Date: Tue., 14 Dec.

    • Time: 17:00 – 19:00

    • Location: Online

    ISTI’S POSTERS

    • Date: Mon., 13 Dec.

    • Time: 14:03 – 14:06

    • Location: Online


    S35D-0245 Machine Learning Applied to Local and Regional Scale Seismic Network Operations

    Authors: Josh C Stachnik, Jeffrey M Leifer, Paul A Friberg; ISTI 

    • Date: Wed., 15 Dec.

    • Time: 17:00 – 19:00

    • Location: Online


    S45E-0345 Implementation of the AQMS/Jiggle System at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network: Process, Pitfalls, and Triumphs

    Authors: Paul A Friberg, Stefan Lisowski, Mike Hagerty, ISTI (w/ Elizabeth A Vanacore, Gisela Baez-Sanchez, Jose M Rivera Torres, Victor A Huerfano Moreno, Jose Cancel, Angel Feliciano, Peggy Gonzalez, Haniel Cordero, Jose F Martinez Colon, Jonathon Rosado Class, Josean Barbosa Toro, Puerto Rico Seismic Network of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez; Lind S Gee, Hal Macbeth, Harley Benz, USGS; David Ketchum, STW Software, Inc.; Margarita M Solares, University of Oregon; Clara E Yoon, Stanford University)

    • Date: Thu., 16 Dec.

    • Time: 17:00 – 19:00

    • Location: Online

    Watch Geobit presentation at SSA 2021

    Watch Geobit presentation at SSA 2021

    GEObit and ISTI are exhibiting at 2021 SSA Virtual Annual Meeting, 19–23 April.

    GEObit provides high sensitivity broadband and wide-band seismic sensors, surface or borehole type, and high dynamic range, low power 32bit ADC data loggers with local data storage and real-time telemetry over seedlink protocol. We are focusing on low power and cost-efficient solutions so we provide to our customer seismic networks with low installation and maintenance costs. Our instruments are ideal for local and regional seismicity and micro-seismicity monitoring and for seismic events such as those induced by unconventional hydrocarbon extraction. Our high fidelity data loggers ensure that these signals are recorded with the highest resolution and timing accuracy.

    Together with ISTI, our USA & Canada representative, we welcome you to visit us online, to meet our team and learn about our new upcoming instruments and technologies. We will also be available to answer your questions.

    You can watch our presentation at Innovation Showcase Session on Wednesday, 21 April, 12:50 PM Pacific Time Zone. Nikos Germenis will present our latest innovative broadband and force balance instruments. Feel free to submit your questions at the end of the presentation.

    More information about the 2021 SSA Annual Meeting may be found here.

    Geo-S120 Broadband Seismometer

    GEOfba200 Force Balance Accelerometer

    Geobit Instruments will not be affected by the “week number rollover” issue on 29th May 2021

    Geobit Instruments will not be affected by the “week number rollover” issue on 29th May 2021

    Geobit Instruments are not affected by the GPS week rollover issue.

    We are pleased to inform you that all GEObit digitizers are using Garmin GPS receivers for time synchronization, and they will not be affected by the GPS rollover issue on 29th May 2021. As a result, all our digitizers will continue operating properly. No action needs to be taken by GEObit Instruments users.

    At GEObit, we are always working to offer state-of-the-art technology and high-reliability products, requiring the minimum possible maintenance.

    What is the GPS Week Number Rollover (WNRO)?

    The GPS system is world renowned for its ability to provide accurate and reliable positioning and timing information worldwide. The GPS satellites transmit to users the date and time accurate to nanoseconds. However, back in 1980, when the GPS system first began to keep track of time, the date and time were represented by a counter that could only count forward to a maximum of 1024 weeks, or about 19.7 years. After 1024 weeks had elapsed, this counter “rolled over” to zero, and GPS time started counting forward again.  This first rollover occurred in August of 1999. The second rollover occurred on April 6, 2019. Several rollovers will happen in the future, depending on the manufacturer and the production date of the GPS receiver.

    Is My Geobit Device Affected?

    Our GPS supplier, Garmin, has anticipated and prepared for this event. Regardless, Garmin and Geobit have been performing exhaustive testing of current and legacy devices to determine if they will be affected by the GPS week number rollover.  Our testing shows the vast majority of Geobit devices will handle the WNRO without issues.

    What is the Effect of a GPS Week Number Rollover Issue?

    For GPS devices that are affected, after the rollover occurs, an incorrect date and time will be displayed. This incorrect time will also be used to timestamp track logs, compute sunrise and sunset, and other functions that rely upon the correct date and time. However, the positioning accuracy will not be affected. The device will continue to deliver the same positioning performance as before the rollover.